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The Mile High German Shorthaired Pointer Rescue Blog

GUIDELINES FOR ADOPTING A GSP PUPPY

1. Having experience as a GSP owner is a major advantage. A German
Shorthaired Pointer is not a breed for everyone. Having a GSP is not at all like
having a Golden Retriever or a Lab. Owners who have adult GSPs know they
can be a challenge many days. Puppies are a challenge every day!

2. You need another active dog for the puppy to have as a mentor and playmate. Although small breeds are delightful and great fun, they generally do not provide enough exercise for the extremely active GSP puppy. Nor does a senior dog who is no longer actively playing and running. Another dog, a mentor/buddy dog, not only provides playtime for the puppy but also helps train him or her and is there to show the puppy the ropes about acceptable dog behavior.

3. You need to be around for the puppy for at least part of the day, not just when
you come home for lunch or after being gone for a typical 8-hour work day.
An adopter needs to be available to potty train and create a bond with the
pup. Because puppies have tiny bladders they need to go outdoors as often as
every two hours. The first few months are the most important for the puppy
to bond with his or her owner which requires the two of them to spend a lot of
quality time together. Having a GSP puppy is a major time and energy commitment.

4. Every active GSP needs daily exercise and consistent training, possibly on
an e-collar. GSPs are one of the sporting breeds and they need more exercise
than you can probably imagine. Playing in the backyard and visits to a dog
park a few times a week are not enough exercise for GSPs, especially not
enough for a young dog once he or she is more than a year old. As with almost
any GSP, a 6 ft. fence is usually required especially because of their prey drive.
Exercise for puppies, however, needs to be regulated. They aren’t physically
ready for vigorous or extensive exercise until they are at least 12 months old.

5. Most GSP’s are very prey-driven and, given the opportunity and training, may
want to hunt. An adopter of a puppy needs to be prepared for that possibility.

*Potential adopters who meet these guidelines will have preference in adopting one
of the puppies coming to us in April.

 

 

Puppies Picture

2 Comments

  • Chad Buckendahl on Oct 05, 2017 Reply

    We have had 2 gsp’s. We have a 6 year old now. Live in Fort Collins on 6 acres. I’ve trained our two and live this bread. Seeing if you still have any females?

  • Todd Beverlin on Sep 08, 2017 Reply Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    Hello,

    I’m looking for a new puppy. My wiem is lonely and looking for a playmate.

    R/Todd

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